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PS/SS Chapter Thirteen Nicolas Flamel - Readdown to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Readdown to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

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PS/SS Chapter Thirteen Nicolas Flamel [2007 Feb. 20th|10:10 pm]
Readdown to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
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Since yesterday's entry was so horribly late, I'll put this one up a bit early.

If you're done with your chocolate frog, then it's time for Harry Potter and the Philosopher's/Sorcerer's Stone Chapter Thirteen Nicolas Flamel.

Did the name ring a bell for you? Did you finish a Quidditch match in five minutes? No? Well, then let's discuss Harry's ability to do both of those shall we?

Also, it seems Hagrid has invited us out to his shack to introduce us to Norbert The Norwegian Ridgeback. Meet you by the Forbidden Forrest at 12:00a US EST 2/22/07.

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Comments:
[User Picture]From: incorporeal_x
2007-02-21 06:29 am (UTC)
I still really want to know how and why Dumbledore defeated Grindelwald.
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[User Picture]From: crescent_gaia
2007-02-22 01:38 am (UTC)

Re: Scholastic 1999 (paperback)

4) The title of the book. Why was it changed to Sorcerer's Stone in the US? Is the meaning of the word "philosopher" that different in the two countries?

Because the Brits think that the Americans are stupid so they changed the name of the book for us. :)
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[User Picture]From: incorporeal_x
2007-02-22 06:26 am (UTC)

Re: Scholastic 1999 (paperback)

Both the book and the motion picture were released in the United States with the revised title Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, citing the reason that most Americans in the target age group would not be as interested in something containing the word "philosopher" as they would "sorcerer", thus hurting sales.

From wiki
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[User Picture]From: pica_scribit
2007-02-23 06:46 am (UTC)

Re: Scholastic 1999 (paperback)

It wouldn't have been up to the Brits; it would have been the decision of the US publisher. I think it was a bad decision, for reasons I cited in my own comment below.
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[User Picture]From: cyn_ful
2007-02-22 04:15 am (UTC)

Re: Scholastic 1999 (paperback)

I picked up on the werewolf bite as well and wondered why it was a huge deal in PoA when Snape introduced it.

I loved the forshadowing as well.
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[User Picture]From: cyn_ful
2007-02-22 05:24 pm (UTC)

Re: Scholastic 1999 (paperback)

The closest I can come up with for the werewolves is like here. We learn about say flowers in elementary school and by the time we reach high school we are studying the body parts of the flower, pistol, stem, etc.

I found two instances in this reading where he got that feeling. This one just stood out. The other was during the troll scene. "Snape gave Harry a swift, piercing look."
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[User Picture]From: pica_scribit
2007-02-23 06:43 am (UTC)

PS:13 - Bloomsbury 1997 (paperback)

I suck. I am still so far behind, and I have to be awake at 6:00 AM tomorrow.

1) Harry's nightmare. We know from chapter two that Harry remembers the green light from the night his parents were killed, and now that he's seen their faces in the mirror, he has a visual of them to go with that. But I'm wondering about that high, cold laugh that keeps getting mentioned. I never really thought about it before, because it does seem in character for Voldemort to laugh as he kills someone. But he didn't want to kill Lily. He gives her every opportunity to live, so why laugh as he's killing her? Is this a false memory of Harry's? Or does he remember the laugh from somewhere else?

2) Harry works himself into exhaustion to deal with the nightmares. Psychologically speaking, this sounds like a very bad way to deal with this problem. Hermione should tell him to go talk to someone. McGonagall, Dumbledore, Madam Pomfrey.

3) Snape refereeing quidditch. Weird. He must really want to protect Harry. So far as we know, he's acting on his own in this book. It doesn't seem that he has told Dumbledore his suspicions about Quirrell at all. Can anyone else come up with another interpretation for this scene, other than "Snape doesn't want Harry dead"? Also, if Snape has not confided to Dumbledore his suspicions, how did he explain his sudden burning desire to ref the game?

4) Hermione loses at chess. The methodical researcher is no good at strategy.

5) Neville and the leg-locker jinx. Poor Neville, not thinking that he's brave enough to be a Gryffindor! I do very much wonder what the Sorting Hat said to him.

6) Nicholas Flamel. You'd think the man would have his own famous wizard card. JKR got his age wrong, by they way. He should not be quite as old as Hermione's book says he is. It's also not clear why this famous French wizard is living in Devon.

7) The Philosopher's Stone. I remember someone once long ago (before there was such a thing as Harry Potter) explaining to me the origin of this concept, and I am not finding anything online about it, so here's what I remember, without references: My understanding is that the philosopher's stone was never meant to be a real object, but a hypothetical one which one of the great ancient Greek philosophers used in discussion for the sake of argument. "What if there was something which turned base metals into gold and produced the elixer of life?" That's why it's called a philosopher's stone. And that's why the title change always bothered me. It felt like they were saying it was better to dumb it down and cater to their audience's potential ignorance than to try to educate that ignorance.

8) Snape's loyalties. Snape is incredibly talented at potions. If he's loyal to Voldemort, as some claim, why is he not trying to make a Philosopher's Stone for his master? Surely the only reason Voldemort allowed a half-blood like Snape to join his side was Snape's extraordinary potions-brewing abilities, which Voldemort could put to use in his own quest for immortality.
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[User Picture]From: pica_scribit
2007-02-23 06:43 am (UTC)

PS:13 - Bloomsbury 1997 (paperback) - 2

9) Harry thinks Snape is following him, trying to catch him alone. Why would Snape be doing this, unless it is to warn him about Quirrell? But then, why would Snape think Quirrell is trying to harm Harry if, as he claims at the beginning of HBP, he thought Quirrell just wanted the stone? The stone is nothing to do with Harry. I put it to you that Snape is fully aware of Quirrell's reasons for wanting the stone. He lied to Bellatrix and Narcissa, and I think his actions in this book prove it. What does that say about his loyalties?

10) "He sometimes had the horrible feeling that Snape could read minds." BWAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!! Sorry; that always gets me.

11) Neville is confused that Ron and Hermione should bring their wands to the quidditch match. Surely witches and wizards take their wands with them wherever they go? Hermione had hers at the last match or she couldn't have set fire to Snape. Unless this just means Neville is surprised to see they have their wands out during the game.

12) Ron and Hermione practiced jinxes in secret. Why wouldn't they tell Harry about this? Surely it would only serve to make him feel more calm about the quidditch match, knowing that his friends were prepared and were looking out for him.

13) The whole school turns out for the quidditch match. This seems to surprised the Gryffindor team. Doesn't the whole school normally turn up? And they seem extra surprised that Dumbledore is there. Dumbledore must not be a quidditch fan. And yet, he always seems to be at the matches when Harry is in danger.

14) Harry's faith in Dumbledore. This is the first time we see Harry's absolute faith in Dumbledore manifest. If Dumbledore is there, nothing bad can happen. Did their little talk about the mirror really inspire that level of confidence?

15) Alternate point of view. Once again, we get a point of view shift for the Quidditch match. This time so we can see a fight between Ron and Neville vs. Malfoy, Crabbe and Goyle? Granted, I really love that we finally get to see Neville's Gryffindore side shine through, but it doesn't seem like good cause for a POV change. Unless something about this scene is really important?

16) Throwing a bone to the Harry/Hermione 'shippers. During the quidditch match and fist fight, Hermione is watching Harry rather than Ron. Granted, Ron's life is probably not actually in peril.

17) Quidditch is boring. Again. Yay for short quidditch scenes!

18) Harry keeps his broom in the broomshed. If I had an expensive racing broom which I used to play a highly competitive sport, I think I'd keep it in my room where it wouldn't get stolen or damaged or jinxed.

19) Why does Snape not tell Dumbledore that Quirrell is trying to steal the stone? Even if Snape doesn't suspect Voldemort's involvement (which I firmly believe he does), surely any attempt to steal this priceless item should be reported to Dumbledore at once. I think this is the first evidence we have of of the fine line Snape treads. He knows Voldemort is involved, but if he pretends he doesn't, then he can try to stop him without looking disloyal later on.

And now I have to go to bed again. I swear I'll get caught up before the book is over!
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[User Picture]From: dolphinluv2783
2007-02-24 07:32 pm (UTC)
I can't remember where else, but there are several references to Harry feeling like Snape can read his mind. Love it!
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